Things to do in Abu Dhabi


Welcome to Abu Dhabi, where luxury and style are infused with traditional values of hospitality and respect. Where sunny weather, tranquil beaches, lush oases, vibrant city life, and a mixture of culture and traditions come together to create a holiday experience like no other. Explore the emirate’s old souqs, sip a fragrant Arabic coffee, ride the dunes on an exhilarating desert safari, or dive into a dazzling marine life - there is something for everyone in Abu Dhabi. Abu Dhabi is the largest of the seven emirates which make up the UAE and accounts for more than 85% of the country’s total landmass. The city, built on the largest of almost 200 natural offshore islands in the Emirates, serves as the capital of the UAE. Abu Dhabi’s population is currently around 1.6 million and is expected to grow by 6.8 per cent per annum over the next decade to a projected 3.4 million by 2015. Abu Dhabi has an estimated 9.2% of the world’s proven oil reserves and 4% of its total proven natural gas reserves. It offers a galaxy of tourist attractions, out-of-the-world resorts and facilities for leisure and recreation. Year-round sunshine and the temptations to unravel the mystique of the Arabian adventures, all combine to make a visit to Abu Dhabi an irresistible choice.

Sheikh Saeed Al-Maktoum House

Sheikh Saeed Al Maktoum was the Ruler of Dubai from 1921 to 1958 and grandfather to the current ruler. His former residence has been rebuilt and restored as a museum that is a fine example of Arabian architecture. The original house was built in 1896 by Sheikh Saeed's father, so he could observe shipping activity from the balconies. The original home was demolished but the current house was rebuilt next to the original site, staying true to the original model by incorporating carved teak doors, wooden lattice screens across the windows and gypsum ventilation screens with floral and geometric designs. Thirty rooms are built around a central courtyard with wind-tower details on top.

Jumeirah Mosque

Jumeirah Mosque is considered by many to be the most beautiful of Dubai's mosques. An exact copy of Cairo's Al-Azhar Mosque that is eight times its size, the Jumeirah Mosque is a fine example of Islamic architecture. This stone structure is built in the medieval Fatimid tradition with two minarets that display the subtle details in the stonework. It is particularly attractive in the evening when lit with floodlights. The Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Centre for Cultural Understanding organises guided tours of the mosque designed to try to foster a better understanding of the Muslim faith. Tours begin at 10am daily, except Fridays.

Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque
Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque was initiated by the late president of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), His Highness Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, who wanted to establish a structure which unites the cultural diversity of Islamic world, the historical and modern values of architecture and art. His final resting place is located on the grounds beside the same mosque. The mosque was constructed from 1996 to 2007. It is the largest mosque in the United Arab Emirates.

Ferrai World
Ferrari World Abu Dhabi is an amusement park located on Yas Island in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. It is the first and only Ferrari-branded theme park and has the record for the largest space frame structure ever built. Formula Rossa, the world's fastest roller coaster, is also located here The foundation stone for the park was laid on 3 November 2007. It took three years to develop the park and it officially opened to the public on 4 November 2010. Ferrari World Abu Dhabi covers an area of 86,000 square metres. Ferrari World Abu Dhabi was named the "Middle East's Leading Tourist Attraction" at the World Travel Awards 2015.

The Corniche
The Corniche is located in the city of Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates. It forms a sweeping curve on the western side of the main Abu Dhabi island and is replete with cycle paths, fountains and park areas Between 2002 and 2003, land was reclaimed from the sea and the Corniche was extended. Some of the earlier landmarks were demolished in the process. Certain parts of the Corniche have significant deposition of sand, with people using the area as a public beach.